Introducing the Nerdy About Nature Podcast!

After a fair amount of pressure from ya'll, I've decided to dive into the wild world of Podcasting. Watch or Listen wherever you prefer!

Oh, hey there!

My name is Ross, and I'm a bit of a nerd for all things nature.I started Nerdy About Nature as a way of documenting and sharing observations and fun facts about the natural world. Blending the perception of a naturalist with philosophy and humor, I aim to make your next venture into the outdoors more enjoyable!Natures pretty neat ya know; I think we should keep it like that, and that we can learn alot along the way.Let's check it out!

Support Nerdy About Nature

Filmmaking ain't easy - there's a fair amount of production, experience, travel and research that goes into each episode, and it all quickly adds up.If you're enjoying all of the fun neature videos I've been creating, I'd truly appreciate you taking a moment to pop on over to my Patreon page and helping to support Nerdy About Nature with a monthly contribution! I have a wide selection of tiers & perks, and would be sooo incredibly stoked to work with ya'll to keep creating rad vids to make your time outside more enjoyable!

Supported by individual Patreon patrons like
Chris Kallal, Brian Kelley, Michael Sherar & folks like you!

© Nerdy About Nature. All rights reserved.

Mission

Through creating fun, engaging and informative content, I aim to inspire folks from all over Cascadia and beyond to get out and explore this world we all call home, regardless of their race, gender, sex, colour, creed, species or domain.The way I see it, the more people understand and know about the world around them, the more they'll appreciate it, care for it, and work to protect it. Ultimately, I aim to encourage people from all walks of life to act in ways that ensure the health and longevity of our local and global ecosystems into the future for the benefit of not only humanity, but all life on this planet.

About me

I grew up in the foothills of the Cascade mountains, on the unceded lands of various Coast Salish Nations, spending countless days of my youth exploring the forests, mountains, and coast of this gorgeous part of the world.Despite being enthralled by the natural world at a very young age, I was drawn to pursue other passions as I grew up. I went to school for biology & film production in Montana on traditional Apsaalooké (Crow) lands which birthed an ongoing career in outdoor adventure sports filmmaking, giving me the incredible opportunity to travel far and wide exploring this amazing world we all call home. Eventually, I ended up spending a few years furthering my surfing passion and obtaining an MBA with emphasis on entrepreneurship & branding in Australia on traditional Wurundjeri & Boonwurrung lands.While I've always returned to and regarded Cascadia as my first love and true home, my travels to remote places and those experiences in the outdoors only furthered my fascination with nature. This endless curiosity has kept me reading books, researching, studying and venturing down wormholes to understand how it all works over the past few decades, which brings me to where we are today.So while I am not a certified forester, biologist, ecologist or scientist, my passion, stoke and knack for effectively communicating somewhat complicated scientific information has lead me here and I couldn't be happier. Through blending naturalist observation habits with my background in film and storytelling, mixed in with a bit of philosophy & humour, I hope to share with you a slice of my profound love for the great outdoors.

Notable Publicity

Recently awarded as one of the top Content Creators to watch of 2022 from Harvard C-Change & Pique Action

Featured & interviewed for a few different series on The Weather Network for national rotation all across Canada.

Featured as a 30 minute television show for local & national Canadian distribution on Shaw Spotlight Channel.

Support

As an independent creator, I am supported primarily by individual viewers like you who enjoy learning from the engaging content I create. I'd like to thank each and every one of you because without you, none of this would be possible!I'd also like to especially thank a few supporters who have gone above and beyond in their contributions on Patreon in the highest tiers offered:
- Chris Kallal
- Brian Kelley
- Michael Sherar

Partners

I am currently not partnered with any brands, businesses or companies, although I would gladly entertain the idea if our values align!If you're interested in partnering or collaborating, feel free to reach out to me and let's chat.

Supported by individual Patreon patrons like
Chris Kallal, Brian Kelley, Michael Sherar & folks like you!

© Nerdy About Nature. All rights reserved.

Books

Here's a collection of my absolute favorite books about all things nature.Instead of giving you links giant monopolizing monsters like Amazon, I've decided to give you some options for supporting quality local bookstores! If you choose to buy in Canada, you'll be directed to Massy Books, a local Indigenous-owned bookstore in Vancouver. If you choose to buy in the States, you'll be directed to Bishop & Wilde, a good friends local startup bookstore in Portland Oregon. Support local and keep nature neat - it's a win / win!

"Braiding Sweetgrass" by Robin Wall Kimmerer
This should be mandatory reading for all human-people all across turtle island, straight up. Not sure where to even start with this one, only that it is the most poetically beautiful piece of literature that brilliantly intertwines Indigenous wisdom with scientific knowledge in addressing some very pressing environmental and social issues we face today.


"Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast" by Jim Pojar & Andrew McKinnon
Hands down one of, if not the best field guide for identifying and understanding much of the flora around Cascadia - I take this one everywhere with me!


"Trees in Canada" by John Laird Farrar
An amazing guide to trees all across Canada, with great information and some really incredible imagery that makes ID a piece of cake!


"Being Ecological" by Timothy Morton
Timothy Morton is one of my favorite modern philosophers who does a lot of work around ecology and mxnkinds place in the world. One of the most eye opening and inspiring books today when it comes to tackling issues related to Climate Change and how we, as a species and fellow living thing on this planet, can go about living with everything else on this planet. Timothy is an amazing author and this is a great introduction to their work!


"Finding The Mother Tree" by Suzanne Simard
One of the most well known forest scientists of today, Suzanne is responsible for some of the most revolutionary discoveries about Oldgrowth Forests that have come about in the last 20 years. This book talks about those discoveries and how they came about through a biography of her life, full of some amazing observations on forests and their connections to humanity, this book is also loaded with wisdom and metaphors for how us humans can live our lives in a better way.


"Gathering Moss" by Robin Wall Kimmerer
Ouf, this book changed my life almost as much as 'Braiding Sweetgrass'. A great introspective look at the role of mosses in our world, and all the great poetic and metaphorical things we can learn from their small, elegant existence.


"Ground Truthing" by Derrick Stacey Denholm
One of my favourite books of all time! Derrick is a poet and forester based on the North Coast of BC, and his work is truly thought provoking when it comes to how we (humans) interact with and value ecosystems from economic, artistic, spiritual and cultural perspectives. A seriously incredible read that I recommend to everyone!


"The Golden Spruce" by John Valliant
A great book based on the true story of Grant Hadwin, a logger who cut down a rare golden Spruce up on Haida Gwaii to make a statement about forestry practices. This is an amazing story that does a great job of explaining various perspectives while written in an engaging, provocative way.
There was also a documentary based on this book called "Hadwins Judgement" which is also pretty good!


"The Final Forest" by William Dietrich
A great story about logging in Forks, Washington, and how the Timber Wars impacted the United States Forest Industry. Engaging and informative, history is always a great thing to understand!


"The Hidden Life of Trees" by Peter Wohlleben
A great, easy and joyful read that dives into some of the wonder that trees are.


Books for Kids

"The Wild World Handbook: Habitats" by Andrea Debbink
This whole series is amazing! A great illustrated and yet incredibly informative book about ecosystems and their function. Heck, I've learned a lot from these books, they're great!


"The Wild World Handbook: Creatures" by Andrea Debbink
The second part of this series is all about Creatures and how we all can protect non-human people throughout the world.


Podcasts & Videos

Podcasts and videos are another great resource for connecting to the great outdoors, and here are some of my favorite shows & episodes!

"Completely Arbortrary" Podcast
Whew - such an awesome, fun podcast all about different trees! Hosted by the legendary Casey Clapp and Alex Crowson, this is a super engaging and informative show - 10/10 recommend!


"Threshold" Podcast
An incredibly informative and deep, journalistic dive into some really important issues these days with great coverage from all angles. Each season covers a new topic - season 1 is one of my favorites!


"How to Save a Planet" Podcast
Fun, quirky, uplifting and yet strikingly informational. A great podcast for the modern era of climate change that we find ourselves in.


"The Wild" Podcast
The Wild is a great podcast that covers various topics and subjects related to the wilderness around us, and our place amongst it. Really well produced series that I absolutely love!


"PBS Eons" Show
OMG one of my favorite shows on natural history, with all sorts of cool episodes ranging from dinosaurs to plants - its the coolest!


"ASAP Science" Show
Probably one of the funniest, most easily accessible science shows that exists - these folks are great!


Instagram & Social Media

Get social with some other folks doing rad things out there!




Supported by individual Patreon patrons like
Chris Kallal, Brian Kelley, Michael Sherar & folks like you!

© Nerdy About Nature. All rights reserved.

# More Than Wood Challenge

The "# More Than Wood Challenge" aim's to rally communities across BC & the world to come together and stand up for the protection of our remaining old growth forests by exercising their civil rights and calling our elected leaders to voice their opinions.

How it Works

- Using an old phone, camera, or a friend, film yourself making a call to either John Horgan or Katrine Conroy telling them to halt all logging in our remaining oldgrowth forests and to find alternatives.

BC Premier John Horgan - 250.387.1715
BC Minister of Forests Katrine Conroy - 250.387.6240

- Post your video to TikTok, Instagram or Facebook using the tag #MoreThanWoodChallenge and spread the word to others.
- Repeat it every day until we see some legitimate action on the issue!

Making the call?

I get it, it's hard. It's intimidating. You may have never done this before and you don't know what to expect and it's triggering sweaty palmed nightmares from all those public speaking classes you ever took - it's alright, I've got you.Fortunately, the societal system we live in makes it relatively easy to speak up and voice your opinion, but I've gone ahead and made it even easier for you. Here are a couple pointers and easy talking points to reference for your calls:

Talking Points

- STOP raw log export to foreign countries and keep what we log in the province for our collective economic gain.
- RETROFIT existing mills to handle smaller logs and create more jobs locally throughout the province.
- CREATE a truly sustainable value-added 2nd and 3rd growth management strategy in our forests by WORKING WITH indigenous & local communities.
- STOP all logging in the last of these ancient forest ecosystems, as they are the remaining 2.7% in the province.

Things to Remember

- Be civil - don't swear, make threats, name-call or be dramatic - there's already too much of that in the world today, we don't need more. Be kind, clear, calm and express yourself with your words.
- Explain why the issue is important to you. If you value the outdoors, work a job, breath air, drink water, have kids, care about the future or your well-being in any way whatsoever, then you've got plenty to draw from here.
- Don't spew inaccurate or subjective 'facts' - give real numbers, real science, and real facts from reputable sources.
- Familiarize yourself with the issue so that you can talk freely about it and bring the discussion to a wider audience. Here are a few great places to start learning:

Further Reading & Resources

Want to do more, or engage in a different way? Here are some other things you can do to make a difference:

These ecosystems are worth so much more than their wood - let's learn how to do things better today and keep them standing for future generations!

© Nerdy About Nature. All rights reserved.

Making the call?

I get it, it's hard. It's intimidating. You may have never done this before and you don't know what to expect and it's triggering sweaty palmed nightmares from all those public speaking classes you ever took - it's alright, I've got you.Fortunately, the societal system we live in makes it relatively easy to speak up and voice your opinion, but I've gone ahead and made it even easier for you. Here are a couple pointers and easy talking points to reference for your calls:

Talking Points

- STOP raw log export to foreign countries and keep what we log in the province for our collective economic gain.
- RETROFIT existing mills to handle smaller logs and create more jobs locally throughout the province.
- CREATE a truly sustainable value-added 2nd and 3rd growth management strategy in our forests by WORKING WITH indigenous & local communities.
- STOP all logging in the last of these ancient forest ecosystems, as they are the remaining 2.7% in the province.

Things to Remember

- Be civil - don't swear, make threats, name-call or be dramatic - there's already too much of that in the world today, we don't need more. Be kind, clear, calm and express yourself with your words.
- Explain why the issue is important to you. If you value the outdoors, work a job, breath air, drink water, have kids, care about the future or your well-being in any way whatsoever, then you've got plenty to draw from here.
- Don't spew inaccurate or subjective 'facts' - give real numbers, real science, and real facts from reputable sources.
- Familiarize yourself with the issue so that you can talk freely about it and bring the discussion to a wider audience. Here are a few great places to start learning:

Further Reading & Resources

Want to do more, or engage in a different way? Here are some other things you can do to make a difference:

These ecosystems are worth so much more than their wood - let's learn how to do things better today and keep them standing for future generations!

Cascadian Card Deck

Collaborating with local Cascadian artist Lizz Miles, we created a deck of playing cards that highlights some of the bioregions most incredible trees, ferns, flowers and shrubs.

$30